COVID-19 Updates

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To keep the public informed, the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders are providing regular updates in government services and pertinent links regarding COVID-19. Coronavirus is a serious illness that spreads from person to person. Cape May County officials are working closely with the State and Federal Government to provide the latest information to help mitigate the spread of this virus.

Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton and Freeholder Jeffrey L. Pierson, who oversees the Cape May County Department of Health want to assure everyone that the County is closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in Cape May County and throughout the region. Their foremost goal is to protect the well-being of our employees and families as well as our residents and visitors and continue to provide essential services to our County.

County government will continue to operate, and all government functions will be offered with some adjustments including limited hours of operation and reduced services. Communications remain open and the public is encouraged to call or email for needed services or information.

We are all working together to keep you informed and safe.

Gerald M. Thornton, Freeholder Director
Jeffrey L. Pierson, Freeholder, liaison, Health and Human Services.

Governor Philip D. Murphy 

Executive Orders Regarding COVID-19

Administrative Orders Regarding COVID-19

The Board of Chosen Freeholders have passed resolutions regarding COVID-19, click here to view the resolutions.


covid testing flyer



The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 10 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1299 including 90 deaths.

9.21.20 covid graphs


COVID-19 and Pregnancy 

According to the Center of Disease Control, pregnant people might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to non-pregnant people. Additionally, pregnant people with COVID-19 may be at increased risk for other adverse outcomes, such as preterm birth. 

Take steps to protect yourself from COVID-19 

There is no way to ensure you have zero risk of infection, so it is important to understand the risks and know how to be as safe as possible. In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. Here are preventive steps you and people you live with can take: 

  • Limit close contact interactions with other people as much as possible. 
  •  When going out or interacting with others outside your immediate household, wear a mask, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Note that wearing a mask is not a substitute for other everyday prevention actions like washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with other people. 
  • Avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear a mask, if possible. 
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others outside your household. o Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. 
  • Avoid activities where taking protective measures may be difficult and where social distancing can’t be maintained. Continue to seek healthcare Don’t skip your healthcare appointments during and after pregnancy.  Visit your healthcare provider for all recommended appointments. If you need help finding one, contact your nearest hospital clinic, community health, or health department.

Talk to your healthcare provider about o How to stay healthy and take care of yourself and your baby. Any questions you have about the best place to deliver your baby. Delivering your baby is always safest under the care of trained healthcare professionals. If you’re concerned about going to your appointments because of COVID-19, ask your healthcare provider what steps they’re taking to separate healthy patients from those who may be sick. Some healthcare providers may choose to cancel or postpone some visits. Others may switch certain appointments to telemedicine visits, which are appointments over the phone or video. These decisions may be based on the situation in your community as well as your individual health risks. Get recommended vaccines and a 30-day supply of your medicines. Getting the recommended vaccines during pregnancy can help protect you and your baby. Get vaccinated against influenza (or flu). Flu and COVID-19 are both respiratory illnesses that can spread from person to person. They can affect breathing and have similar symptoms, but they are caused by different viruses (read more about similarities and differences between flu and COVID-19). It is unknown how these two viruses may interact during the upcoming flu season. There is no vaccine available to protect against the virus that causes COVID-19. You should protect yourself against flu by getting vaccinated. Others living in your household should also get vaccinated to protect themselves and you. Get the whooping cough (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy to protect your baby against whooping cough, which can also present with similar symptoms to COVID-19. Ask your doctor and pharmacy to give you at least a 30-day supply of the medicines you need. 

Call your healthcare provider if you have any health concerns. These concerns may include: 

  • You think you have COVID-19 (call within 24 hours). 
  • You think you are experiencing depression during or after pregnancy.

You have any questions related to your health. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook

COVID-19 Update 9/20/20

As COVID-19 Continues to be a Part of Everyday Life, It is Important to Not Let Your Guard Down, Even When You are Hosting the Gathering Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 2 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1289 including 90 deaths. 

9.20.20 covid graphs

“The closer you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. If you decide to engage in social activities, it is important to protect yourself and practice prevention measures, such as social distancing, hand hygiene and wearing a facial covering,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer. 

As communities and businesses are opening, people are trying to get back to normal activities as safely as possible. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, it is important to understand potential risks and how to adopt different types of prevention measures to protect yourself and others. When planning your own gathering it is important for you to consider your own personal situation and the risk for you, your family, and your guests. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests taking the following precautions when hosting a social gathering:  

  • Remind guests to stay home if they are sick. Encourage social distancing. For example, host your gatherings outside, when possible. 
  • Wear facial coverings over nose and mouth when social distancing is not possible, especially when indoors. 
  • Clean hands often with soup and water. If notpossible, use hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.  
  • Limit the number of people handling or serving food. 
  • Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items. Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use when feasible. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Faceboo

COVID-19 Update 9/19/20

Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 8 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. 

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1287 including 90 deaths.  

9.19.20 covid graphs

“Now that we are entering into respiratory season it is going to be more important than ever for individuals to stay home if sick. We urge individuals who think they have COVID-19 or have been diagnosed to stay home and isolate themselves from others,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

When an individual is identified as a positive COVID-19 case they will be asked to isolate. Isolation is when a sick individual is kept from others to help stop the spread of a disease. Unlike quarantine, which is when an individual who is possible exposed is kept from others to help stop the spread of a disease. If you have any of the following symptoms, Fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and or diarrhea, it is important that you isolate and call your primary care physician to determine what your next step should be. COVID-19 isolation recommendations can vary from person to person. Specific instructions will be given to an individual on a case by case basis.

For most persons with COVID-19 illness, isolation and precautions can generally be discontinued 10 days after symptom onset and resolution of fever for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing medications, and with improvement of other symptoms (CDC,2020). A limited number of persons with severe illness may produce replication-competent virus beyond 10 days that may warrant extending duration of isolation and precautions for up to 20 days after symptom onset; consider consultation with infection control experts. For persons who never develop symptoms, isolation and other precautions can be discontinued 10 days after the date of their first positive RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 RNA.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/18/20

As Cape May County Continues to See COVID-19 Cases It is Important That Individuals Understand Quarantine

Cape May Court House- The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 13 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. 

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1279 including 90 deaths.  

 9.18.20 covid graphs

Since COVID-19 is a new disease we are still learning new information and best practice on how to decrease the spread. One strategy that is being used to decrease the spread of COVID-19 is by quarantining individuals that are identified as close contacts,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine differs from isolation because isolation is used to keep a sick individual away from others. An individual is asked to quarantine if they have been identified as a close contact. New Jersey Department of Health defines a close contact as anyone who was within six feet of you for more than 10 minutes at least two days before your positive test if you didn't have any symptoms, or two days before your first symptom appeared. An individual that needs to quarantine should do the following:

Stay home for 14 full days after last exposure

Separate themselves from others

Monitor health Watch for fever (100.4◦F), cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.

Follow directions from their state or local health department

An individual may end quarantine usually after 14 full days after last contact of COVID-19 positive person. If they are in contact with a household contact their quarantine begins when that individual’s isolation period is finished. A negative COVID-19 test does not exempt an individual from quarantine. An individual from state or local health department will be in contact with anyone who is identified as a close contact to give specific instructions on quarantine.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/17/20

As More Indoor Activities Begin to Open In New Jersey it is Important to Continue to Practice Preventative Measures


The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 12 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1266 including 90 deaths.

9.17.20 covid graph

“New Jersey continues to open up and now one of the options when you go to one of Cape May County’s restaurants is indoor or outdoor dining. As more indoor activities slowly become available it is important to continue to practice prevention measures against COVID-19, especially with the upcoming respiratory illness season,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

To prepare yourself for eating out Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the following:

Check the restaurant’s COVID-19 prevention practices before you go

  • Check the restaurant’s website and social media to see if they have updated their information to address any COVID-19 safety guidelines.
  • Before you go to the restaurant, call, and ask if all staff are wearing masks while at work.
  • Ask about options for self-parking to remove the need for a valet service.
  •  

Take steps to protect yourself at the restaurant

  • Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors.
  • Take precautions – like wearing a mask as much as possible when not eating and maintaining a proper social distance if you are dining with others who don’t live with you.
  • Maintain a social distance of 6 feet or more in any entryway, hallway, or waiting area.
  • When possible, sit outside at tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from other people.
  • When possible, choose food and drink options that are not self-serve to limit the use of shared serving utensils, handles, buttons, or touchscreens.

 

Wash your hands

  • Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting the restaurant. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Before using the restroom, make sure there is adequate soap and paper towels or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/16/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 8 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1254 including 90 deaths.

9.16.20 covid graphs

“As of September 1,2020, Governor Murphy allowed gyms to reopen at 25% capacity. Exercise is a main component to health, but before you go running back to the gym make sure you continue to take protective precautions, such as cleaning equipment before using, washing hands, wearing a mask, and practice social distancing,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

When returning to your local gym the Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests doing the following:

 

Prepare before you go


  • Use options for online reservations and check-in systems when available.
  • Look for any extra prevention practices being implemented by the facility, such as new plexiglass barriers, staff wearing masks, and closing of shared locker room space.
  • Be prepared that locker room access may be limited to the restroom area only, prohibiting the use of shower and changing areas.


Limit activity indoors, especially group activities


  • Seek facilities with outdoor space or options for virtual classes and training sessions as much as possible.
  • Limit attendance at indoor group training sessions.  If you do attend such a session, maintain as much distance as possible between yourself and other individuals, and use masks if they do not interfere with your activity. If you need to be indoors, open windows to increase airflow throughout the space.


Use social distancing and limit physical contact


  • Maintain at least 6 feet of separation as much as possible in areas that may lead to close contact (within 6 feet) among other people, such as weight rooms, group fitness studios, pools and saunas, courts and fields, walking/running tracks, locker rooms, check-in areas, parking lots, and routes of entry and exit.
  • Do not shake hands, give high-fives, do elbow bumps, or touch others because close contact increases the risk of acquiring COVID-19.


Take extra precautions with shared equipment


  • Ensure equipment is clean and disinfected. Wipe down machines and equipment with disinfecting wipes and use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol before using machines.
  • Do not share items that cannot be cleaned, sanitized, or disinfected between use, such as resistance bands and weightlifting belts.

 

Wear a mask


  • Wear a mask when interacting with other people to minimize the risk of transmitting the virus.
  • Wearing masks is most important when physical distancing is difficult and when exercise type and intensity allows. Consider doing any vigorous-intensity exercise outside when possible and stay at least 6 feet away from other participants, trainers, and clients if unable to wear a mask.
  • If possible, wear a mask when walking on an indoor track or when doing stretching or low-intensity forms of yoga indoors.
  • Wash your hands before adjusting your mask—review information about proper use, removal, and washing of masks.

 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/15/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents as listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1146 including 90 deaths.

9.15.20 covid graphs

“It is possible to get both COVID-19 and the seasonal flu at the same time, which makes it more important to take all precautionary measures. You can prevent the seasonal flu and COVID-19 by covering your coughs and sneezes, social distancing, washing frequently touched surfaces, stay home if sick and washing your hands. The flu vaccine may not protect you from COVID-19, but it is the best way to prevent the flu and in return protect yourself and others,” stated Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

For the upcoming flu season, flu vaccination will be very important because it will help reduce the overall impact of respiratory illnesses on the population and thus lessen the resulting burden on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic (CDC, 2020). The vaccine is recommended for everyone six months and older, including pregnant women. Individuals that are at most risk for getting severely ill from the flu are young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, and people aged 65 years and older. It takes approximately two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop protection against the flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend getting a flu vaccine every year because flu viruses evolve quickly, and last year’s vaccine may not protect against the current year’s strain. Even if the vaccine does not fully protect against the flu, it may reduce the severity of symptoms and the risk of complications.

Most pharmacies and doctors’ offices are offering the flu shot and due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Health Department will be offering free flu vaccine by appointment only at the following locations:

Flu Vaccine Drive -Thru Clinics: Individuals 13 years and older will be offered at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210.

  • October 3, 2020 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
  • October 17, 2020 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

 The Family Flu clinics will be offered at Cape May County National Guard Armory, 600 Garden State Pkwy, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 (Exit 11)

  • October 6, 2020, from 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
  • October 14, 2020 from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
  • October 22, 2020 from 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

All flu clinics are by appointment only and will require a completed consent form. Masks must also be worn to receive a flu vaccine. High dose vaccine will be offered as supplies last. Please request high dose when making your appointment. To make an appointment call (609) 465-1187. For consent forms and more information on upcoming flu clinics, visit www.cmchealth.net - Click Seasonal Flu. Also, like us on Facebook for updated information.

COVID-19 Update 9/14/20

As the New School Year Begins it is Important to Help our Children Cope with Stress During COVID-19

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 4 new positive cases among County residents and 1 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below. Sadly, we are announcing the passing of a 64-year old male from Woodbine, “I would like to express my sincere condolences to friends and family during this sad time,” said Cape May County Freeholder Jeff Pierson.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1240 including 90 deaths.

9.14.20 covid graphs

“With children back in school, parents and/or guardians are helping children adjust to the new norm of school. One of the ways children learn to react to stress is by observing adults in their lives coping mechanisms. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children and better help them cope with stress (CDC, 2020),” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer.

Families across the country are adapting to the evolving changes in daily life caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Parents and guardians are taking on the responsibility of helping their children adjust to the new normal, such as trying to keep children occupied, feeling safe, and attempting to keep up with schoolwork as best as possible. It is important to remember that children look to adults for guidance on how to react to a stressful situation. Parents can help reduce children’s anxiety by teaching them positive preventative measures, talking with them about their fears, and giving them a sense of some control over their risk of infection. This is also a tremendous opportunity for adults to model for children problem-solving, flexibility, and compassion as we all work through adjusting daily schedules, balancing work and other activities, getting creative about how we spend time, processing new information from authorities, and connecting and supporting friends and family members in new ways (National Association of School Psychologists, 2019). The following tips can help:

  • Be a role model
  • Be aware of how you talk about COVID-19
  • Explain social distancing
  • Demonstrate deep breathing
  • Focus on the positive
  • Establish and maintain a daily routine
  • Identify projects that might help others
  • Offer lots of love and affection

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/13/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents and 3 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1236 including 89 deaths.

9.13.20 covid graphs

People with Certain Medical Conditions

People of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 including the following:

COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of underlying medical conditions and whether they increase the risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Based on what we know at this time, people with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

Children who have medical complexity, who have neurologic, genetic, metabolic conditions, or who have congenital heart disease might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to other children.

The list of underlying conditions is meant to inform clinicians to help them provide the best care possible for patients, and to inform individuals as to what their level of risk may be so they can make individual decisions about illness prevention. We are learning more about COVID-19 every day. This list is a living document that may be updated at any time, subject to potentially rapid change as the science evolves.

Reduce your risk of getting COVID-19

It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19.

The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to:

If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.

Venturing out into a public setting? What to consider before you go.

As communities and businesses across the United States are opening, you may be thinking about resuming some activities, running errands, and attending events and gatherings. There is no way to ensure you have zero risk of infection, so it is important to understand the risks and know how to be as safe as possible.

People at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, should consider their level of risk before deciding to go out and ensure they are taking steps to protect themselves. Consider avoiding activities where taking protective measures may be difficult, such as activities where social distancing can’t be maintained. Everyone should take steps to prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 to protect themselves, their communities, and people who are at increased risk of severe illness.

In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. 

  • If you decide to engage in public activities, continue to protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
  • Keep these items on hand and use them when venturing out: a mask, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible.
  • If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.

Are you considering in-person visits with family and friends? Here are some things to consider to help make your visit as safe as possible:

When to delay or cancel a visit 

In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. So, think about:

  • How many people will you interact with?
  • Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others?
  • Will you be outdoors or indoors?
  • What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?

Encourage social distancing during your visit

  • Visit with your friends and family outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open windows or doors) and large enough to accommodate social distancing.
  • Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart from each other.
  • Consider activities where social distancing can be maintained, like sidewalk chalk art or yard games.
  • Try to avoid close contact with your visitors. For example, don’t shake hands, elbow bump, or hug. Instead wave and verbally greet them.
  • If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.
  • Consider keeping a list of people you visited or who visited you and when the visit occurred. This will help with contact tracing if someone becomes sick.

Wear masks

  • Masks should be worn over the nose and mouth. Masks are especially important when it is difficult to stay at least 6 feet apart from others or when people are indoors to help protect each other.
  • Masks may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others
    • Wearing a mask helps protects others in case you’re infected, while others wear one to protect you should they be infected.
  • Who should NOT use masks: Children under age 2 or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, or is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

Wash hands often

  • Everyone should wash their hands for at least 20 seconds at the beginning and end of the visit and whenever you think your hands may have become contaminated.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, such as with outdoor visits or activities, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Remind guests to wash or sanitize their hands before serving or eating food.
  • Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so visitors do not share towels. Have a no-touch trash can available for guests to use.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/12/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 7 new positive cases among County residents.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1230 including 89 deaths.

9.12.20 covid graphs

Deciding to Go Out

  • In general, the more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.
  • If you decide to engage in public activities, continue to protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
  • Keep these items on hand when venturing out: a mask, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with

Understand the potential risks of going out

As communities and businesses are opening, you may be looking for ways to resume some daily activities as safely as possible. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, it is important to understand potential risks and how to adopt different types of prevention measures to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The risk of an activity depends on many factors, such as:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading in your community?
  • Will you have a potential close contact with someone who is sick or anyone who is not wearing a mask (and may be asymptomatic)?
  • Are you at increased risk of severe illness?
  • Do you take everyday actions to protect yourself from COVID-19?

CDC cannot provide the specific risk level for every activity in every community. That’s why it’s important for you to consider your own personal situation and the risk for you, your family, and your community before venturing out.

Close contact with other people increases risk

In general, the more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. So, think about:

How many people will you interact with?

  • Interacting with more people raises your risk.
  • Being in a group with people who aren’t social distancing or wearing masks increases your risk.
  • Engaging with new people (e.g., those who don’t live with you) also raises your risk.
  • Some people have the virus and don’t have any symptoms, and it is not yet known how often people without symptoms can transmit the virus to others.

Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others? Will you be outdoors or indoors?

  • The closer you are to other people who may be infected, the greater your risk of getting sick.
  • Keeping distance from other people is especially important for people who are at higher risk for severe illness, such as older adults and those with underlying medical conditions.
  • Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor spaces where it might be harder to keep people apart and there’s less ventilation.

What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?

  • Spending moretime with people who may be infected increases your risk of becoming infected.
  • Spending more time with people increases their risk of becoming infected if there is any chance that you may already be infected.

What makes activities safer

Activities are safer if

  • You can maintain at least 6 feet of space between you and others. COVID-19 spreads easier between people who are within 6 feet of each other.
  • They are held in outdoor spaces. Indoor spaces with less ventilation where it might be harder to keep people apart are more risky.
  • People are wearing masks. Interacting without wearing masks also increases your risk.


Prioritize outdoor spaces where people are wearing masks and keeping 6 feet away from others

Stay home if you are sick

If you have COVID-19, have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, or have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, it is important to stay home and away from other people. When you can leave home and be around others depends on different factors for different situations.

 Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/11/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 11 new positive cases among County residents.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1223 including 89 deaths.

9.11.20 covid graphs

Tips to Protect Children During a COVID-19 Outbreak

Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date.

Watch your child for any signs of COVID-19 illness

COVID-19 can look different in different people. People can get a fever, cough, or have a hard time taking deep breaths. Most people who have gotten COVID-19 have not gotten very sick. Only a small group of people who get it have had more serious problems.

CDC and partners are investigating cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19.

Take steps to protect children and others

Follow these everyday preventive actions and tips to help children stay healthy.

  • Clean hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid people who are sick (coughing and sneezing).
  • Put distance between your children and other people outside of your home. Keep children at least 6 feet from other people.
  • Children 2 years and older should wear a mask over their nose and mouth when in public settings where it’s difficult to practice social distancing. This is an additional public health measure people should take to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in addition to (not instead of) the other everyday preventive actions listed above.
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (like tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, and sinks).
  • Launder items including washable plush toys as needed. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Make sure your children are up to date on well-child visits and immunizations.

Limit in person playtime with other children, and connect virtually if possible

CDC recognizes this pandemic has been stressful to many and that socializing and interacting with peers can be a healthy way for children to cope with stress and connect with others. However, the key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to limit close contact as much as possible. It is important to understand potential risks and measures that you can take to protect yourself and your family.

An important guiding principle to remember is that the more people children interact with, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. While children may be spending time with other people as they return to daycare or school settings, it is important to remember that exposure to additional children and adults outside of daycare or school should be managed to decrease risk.

For playdates, the risk of COVID-19 increases as follows:

Lowest risk: No in-person playdates. Children connect virtually (via phone calls and video chats).

Medium risk: Infrequent playdates with the same family or friend who is also practicing everyday preventive measures. Children maintain a distance of 6 feet from each other during the playdate. Playdates should be held outdoors, if possible. Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor space where it might be harder to keep children apart and there is less ventilation.

Highest Risk: Frequent indoor playdates with multiple friends or families who are notpracticing everyday preventive measures. Children do not maintain a distance of 6 feet from each other.

To help children maintain social connections while social distancing, help your children have supervised phone calls or video chats with their friends.

Clean hands often

Make sure children practice everyday preventive behaviors, such as washing their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important if you have been in a public place.

Consider changing travel plans

Because travel increases your chances of getting infected and spreading COVID-19, staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from getting sick. We don’t know if one type of travel is safer than others; however, airports, bus stations, train stations, and rest stops are all places travelers can be exposed to the virus in the air and on surfaces. These are also places where it can be hard to social distance (keep 6 feet apart from other people). Consult CDC’s travel considerations for more information on traveling in the United States.

Limit time with people at highest risk of severe illness from COVID-19

  • If others in your home have an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, consider extra precautions to separate your child from those people.
  • If you are unable to stay home with your child while school is out, carefully consider who might be best positioned to provide child care. If someone at higher risk for COVID-19 will be providing care (older adult, such as a grandparent or someone with a chronic medical condition), limit your children’s contact with other people.
  • Consider postponing visits or trips to see older family members and grandparents. Connect virtually or by writing letters and sending via mail.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/10/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 12 new positive cases among County residents. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1212 including 89 deaths.

9.10.20 covid graphs

Gyms and fitness centers may reopen indoor and outdoor spaces so long as they follow required social distancing and other safety protocols.

What to Expect in Outdoor Spaces of Gyms

The following summarizes some of the protocols contained in Executive Order No. 157. However, this summary is not a replacement for fully complying with the terms of Executive Order No. 157 and businesses should read the full guidance carefully to ensure full compliance.

Gyms and fitness centers must institute the following policies:

  • Limit total capacity of any outdoor area to a number that ensures that all individuals can remain six feet apart
  • Require workers and customers to wear cloth face coverings while indoors and in outdoor areas when social distancing is difficult to maintain, except where doing so would inhibit that individual's health
  • If a customer refuses to wear a cloth face covering for non-medical reasons, then the business must decline the individual entry into the indoor premises
  • Limit occupancy in restrooms that remain open to avoid over-crowding and maintain social distancing through signage and, where practicable, the utilization of attendants to monitor capacity
  • Require frequent sanitization of high-touch areas
  • Limit the use of equipment rented or otherwise to one person at a time, excluding immediate family members, caretakers, household members, or romantic partners, and sanitize such equipment before and after use
  • Require reservations, cancellations and prepayments be made via electronic or telephone reservation systems to limit physical interactions

What to Expect in Indoor Spaces of Gyms

The following summarizes some of the protocols contained in Executive Order No. 181 and the Department of Health's guidance for health clubs/gyms/fitness centers. However, this summary is not a replacement for fully complying with the terms of Executive Order No. 181 and the Department of Health's guidance for health clubs/gyms/fitness centers, and businesses should read the full guidance carefully to ensure full compliance.


Gyms and fitness centers must institute the following policies:

  • Limit occupancy of any indoor premises to 25 percent of the stated maximum capacity, if applicable, at one time, excluding staff.
  • In addition to capacity restrictions, indoor group activities (e.g., classes) can occur but must limit to no more 1 individual per 200 square feet of accessible space or less, AND all individuals must be able to maintain a minimum of 6 feet of distance from other individuals during the entire class.
  • Conduct a temperature screening and questionnaire of staff and clients upon entrance to the facility.
  • If individuals attending outdoor classes enter the center premises, whether to use a restroom or otherwise, they must be included in the capacity limit indicated above.
  • Require workers and customers to wear cloth face coverings while in the indoor portion of the premises, except where doing so would inhibit that individual's health or where the individual is under two years of age.
  • If a customer refuses to wear a cloth face covering for non-medical reasons and if such covering cannot be provided to the individual by the business at the point of entry, then the business must decline the individual entry into the indoor premises.
  • One-on-one personal training can occur assuming 6 feet of distance can be maintained for the majority of the training session.
  • Individual or pair activities which do not involve contact (e.g., racket ball, handball) can also occur.
  • Keep doors and windows open where possible and utilize fans to improve ventilation.
  • Inspect and evaluate the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit to ensure that the system is operating within its design specifications
  • Limit locker room use to hand washing and restroom use
  • In gyms with pools, limit shower use to individually partitioned showers or communal showers with installed barriers/partitions; in other gyms, showers are not permitted
  • Shared saunas and steam rooms are not permitted.

Guidance for Employees

Gyms and fitness centers must implement safety policies for employees that include, but are not limited to:

  • Require employees with symptoms of COVID-19 be sent home
  • Require all employees to wear face coverings while indoors, except where doing so would inhibit the individual's health
  • Require workers to wear gloves when in contact with customers or goods
  • Provide all employees with face coverings and gloves free of charge
  • Provide employees break time for repeated handwashing throughout the workday
  • Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes to staff

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/9/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 7 new positive cases among County residents. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1200 including 89 deaths.

9.9.20 covid graphs

On September 1, 2020, Governor Murphy issued Executive Order No. 183 allowing indoor dining at retail food and beverage establishments. The establishments are to adhere to the protocols listed below:

Food Establishment Responsibilities for Indoor Dinning

  • Ensure all areas designated for food and/or beverage consumption are in compliance with applicable local, State, and Federal regulations.
  • Establish a written, worksite-specific COVID-19 prevention plan at every location, perform a comprehensive risk assessment of all work areas, and designate a person to implement the plan.
  • Limit the number of patrons in indoor areas to 25 percent of the food or beverage establishment’s indoor capacity, excluding the food or beverage establishment’s employees. Ensure that the new maximum occupancy limits are posted.
  • Post signage at the entrance that states that no one with a fever or symptoms of
  • COVID-19 should enter the establishment.
  • Ensure that tables where individuals or groups are seated are six feet (6 ft) apart in all directions from any other table or seat and that individual seats in any shared area that is not reserved for individual groups, such as an indoor bar area, are also six feet apart in all directions from any other table or seat.
  • Limit seating to a maximum of eight (8) customers per table (unless they are from a family from the same household).
  • Bar seating may be utilized if customers are seated and comply with physical distancing guideline of at least 6 ft between customers. Standing in a bar area is not permitted.
  • A maximum of 4 customers that have a common relationship may sit together at the bar, while adhering to the physical distancing guidelines between other customers.
  • Install physical barriers and partitions at cash registers, bars, host stands and other area where maintaining physical distance of 6 ft is difficult.
  • Rope-off or otherwise mark tables, chairs and bar stools that are not to be used.
  • Provide physical guides, such as tape on floors and signage on walls to remind customers/visitors to remain at least 6 ft apart in line and/or in common areas.
  • Eliminate self-service food such as buffets and salad bars. Limit self-service drink stations to those that can be routinely and effectively cleaned and disinfected.
  • Eliminate all amenities and congregate areas such as children’s recreational/play areas, dance floors, and game rooms that encourage close person to person interaction.
  • Consider using digital menus, single-use disposable menus (e.g., paper) discarded after each customer, or a written posting such as a chalkboard or whiteboard to relay menu information. Businesses shall use such alternatives where traditional menus cannot be appropriately sanitized between uses.
  • Consider using single-use condiments and table items.
  • Require all reusable linen napkins and/or tablecloths to be laundered after each customer or party’s use.
  • Provide hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol for employees and customers close to workstations and customer tables.
  • Use touchless payment options as much as possible, if available.
  • Implement a restroom use policy to limit the number of customers inside the restroom.
  • Ensure that live performers remain at least 10 ft from patrons and staff.
  • Consider conducting health checks for all live performers and encourage the use of masks when feasible.


Cleaning and Disinfection

  • Disinfect all tables, chairs and any other shared items (menus, condiments, pens) after each use.
  • Clean commonly touched surfaces in restrooms (e.g., toilet seats, doorknobs, stall handles, sinks, paper towel dispensers, soap dispensers) frequently and in accordance with CDC guidelines.
  • Conduct frequent disinfecting of heavy transit areas and high-touch surfaces (e.g., doorknobs, staircases like credit card machines, keypads, and counter areas to which employees and customers have access).
  • Implement procedures to increase cleaning and disinfection in the kitchen areas. Avoid all food contact surfaces when using disinfectants. Food contact surfaces must be cleaned and sanitized before use with a sanitizer approved for food contact surfaces. Non-food contact surfaces must be frequently cleaned.
  • Maintain cleaning logs that include date, time, and scope of cleaning.
  • In the event of a presumptive or actual positive COVID-19 case of a worker, patron, or vendor, the restaurant must be immediately shut down for 24 hours and then must be cleaned and disinfected in accordance with current CDC guidance before re-opening.

 

Indoor Air/ Ventilation


  • Keep doors and windows open where possible and utilize fans to improve ventilation.
  • Inspect and evaluate the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit to ensure that the system is operating within its design specifications.
  • Conduct routine maintenance as recommended by the manufacturer or HVAC professional.
  • Within the design specification of the HVAC unit:
  • Increase the volume of outdoor air to the maximum capacity while the facility is occupied.
  • Reduce the volume of recirculated air being returned to the indoor spaces.
  • Increase the volume of air being delivered to the indoor spaces to the maximum capacity.
  • Select maximum filtration levels for the HVAC unit.
  • Run the HVAC unit continuously while the facility is occupied.
  • Run the HVAC unit for at least two hours before and two hours after the facility is occupied.
  • Consider installing portable air cleaners equipped with a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to increase the amount of clean air within the facility.
  • Review and follow the latest CDC guidance for ventilation requirements.

 

EMPLOYEES

 

  • Require employees to wash and/or sanitize their hands when entering the food or beverage establishment.
  • Prior to each shift, conduct daily health checks (e.g. temperature screening and/or symptom checking) of employees safely and respectfully, and in accordance with any applicable privacy laws and regulations.
  • Require employees with symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough, or shortness of breath) be sent home.
  • Require employees to wear a face covering/mask, except where it would inhibit the individual’s health, or where doing so would create an unsafe condition in which to operate equipment or execute a task (i.e. cooks that work near open flames). Employers must provide all employees with such face coverings.
  • Require all customer-facing employees (e.g. servers, bus staff) to minimize time spent within 6 ft of customers.
  • Require infection control practices, such as regular handwashing, coughing and sneezing etiquette, and proper tissue usage and disposal.
  • Provide employees break time for repeated handwashing throughout the workday.
  • Place tables in break rooms six feet apart and encourage outdoor breaks.
  • Prohibit the use of small spaces (e.g. freezers, storage rooms) by more than one individual at a time.
  • Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes to staff.


CUSTOMERS

 

  • Consider conducting health surveillance assessment for customers (e.g. temperature screening and/or COVID-19 symptom checking). Refuse entry if customer is found with any COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Inform customers of COVID-19 safety measures such as social distancing, wearing face coverings when they are away from their table and unable to social distance and hygiene practices must be adhered to while in the food or beverage establishment.
  • Customers must wear face coverings at all times, except where doing so would inhibit the individual’s health, or where the individual is under two years of age.
  • When seated at their table or their individual seat, indoor patrons shall wear face coverings until their food or drinks arrive, and after individuals have finished consuming their food or drinks, they shall put their face coverings back on.
  • Decline entry to a customer who is not wearing a face covering, unless the customer has a medical reason for not doing so or is a child under two years of age.
  • Consider requiring reservations for greater control of customer traffic/volume.
  • Recommend customers to provide a phone number if making a reservation to facilitate contact tracing.
  • Require customers wait in their cars, outside the establishment or away from the food or beverage establishment while waiting for a table if wait area cannot accommodate social distancing.
  • Alert customers via calls/texts to limit touching and discourage the use of shared objects such as pagers/buzzers.
  • Food or beverage establishments with table service must require that customers be seated in order to place orders.
  • Food or beverage establishments with table service must require that wait staff bring food or beverages to seated customers.
  • Customers may consume food or beverages only while seated.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/8/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 6 new positive cases among County residents and 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1193 including 89 deaths.

9.8.20 covid graphs

If you are thinking about participating in an event or gathering during the pandemic:

If you are at increased risk for severe illness, consider avoiding high-risk gatherings. The risk of COVID-19 spreading at events and gatherings increases as follows:

Lowest risk: Virtual-only activities, events, and gatherings.

More risk: Smaller outdoor and in-person gatherings in which individuals from different households remain spaced at least 6 feet apart, wear masks, do not share objects, and come from the same local area (e.g., community, town, city, or county).

Higher risk: Medium-sized in-person gatherings that are adapted to allow individuals to remain spaced at least 6 feet apart and with attendees coming from outside the local area.

Highest risk: Large in-person gatherings where it is difficult for individuals to remain spaced at least 6 feet apart and attendees travel from outside the local area.

Stay healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Staying healthy during the pandemic is important. Talk to your healthcare provider about whether your vaccinations and other preventive services are up to date to help prevent you from becoming ill with other diseases.

  • It is particularly important for those at increased risk of severe illness, including older adults, to receive recommended vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcal disease.
  • Remember the importance of staying physically active and practicing healthy habits to cope with stress.

 If you have an underlying medical condition, you should continue to follow your treatment plan:

  • Continue your medicines and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Have at least a 30-day supply of prescription and non-prescription medicines. Talk to a healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about getting an extra supply (i.e., more than 30 days) of prescription medicines, if possible, to reduce your trips to the pharmacy.
  • Do not delay getting emergency care for your underlying medical condition because of COVID-19. Emergency departments have contingency infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care.
  • Call your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your underlying medical conditions or if you get sick and think that you may have COVID-19. If you need emergency help, call 911 right away.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/7/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 10 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1187 including 89 deaths.  

9.7.20

Are you considering in-person visits with family and friends during a pandemic? Here are some things to consider to help make your visit as safe as possible:

When to delay or cancel a visit 

Delay or cancel a visit if you or your visitors have symptoms of COVID-19 or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days.

Anyone who has had close contact with a person with COVID-19 should stay home and monitor for symptoms.

In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. So, think about:

How many people will you interact with?

Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others?

Will you be outdoors or indoors?

What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?

Encourage social distancing during your visit

Visit with your friends and family outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open windows or doors) and large enough to accommodate social distancing.

Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart from each other.

Consider activities where social distancing can be maintained, like sidewalk chalk art or yard games.

Try to avoid close contact with your visitors. For example, don’t shake hands, elbow bump, or hug. Instead wave and verbally greet them.

If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.

Consider keeping a list of people you visited or who visited you and when the visit occurred. This will help with contact tracing if someone becomes sick.

 

 

Wear masks

Masks should be worn over the nose and mouth. Masks are especially important when it is difficult to stay at least 6 feet apart from others or when people are indoors to help protect each other.

Masks may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others

Wearing a mask helps protects others in case you’re infected, while others wear one to protect you should they be infected.

Who should NOT use masks: Children under age 2 or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, or is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

Wash hands often

Everyone should wash their hands for at least 20 seconds at the beginning and end of the visit and whenever you think your hands may have become contaminated.

If soap and water are not readily available, such as with outdoor visits or activities, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

Remind guests to wash or sanitize their hands before serving or eating food.

Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so visitors do not share towels. Have a no-touch trash can available for guests to use.

Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items

Encourage your visitors to bring their own food and drinks.

Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use.

If you choose to use any shared items that are reusable (e.g., seating covers, tablecloths, linen napkins), wash, clean, and sanitize them after the event.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/6/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 11 new positive cases among County residents and 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1177 including 89 deaths.  

9.6.20 covid graphs

If your Caring for Someone Sick at Home be sure to Protect Yourself

Limit contact

Keep a separate bedroom and bathroom for a person who is sick

COVID-19 spreads between people who are in close contact (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets, created when someone talks, coughs or sneezes. Staying away from others helps stop the spread of COVID-19.

The caregiver, when possible, should not be someone who is at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

The person who is sick should isolate

The sick person should separate themselves from others in the home. Learn when and how to isolate.

If possible, have the person who is sick use a separate bedroom and bathroom. If possible, have the person who is sick stay in their own “sick room” or area and away from others. Try to stay at least 6 feet away from the sick person.

Shared space: If you have to share space, make sure the room has good air flow.

Open the window to increase air circulation.

Improving ventilation helps remove respiratory droplets from the air.

Avoid having visitors. Avoid having any unnecessary visitors, especially visits by people who are at higher risk for severe illness.

Caregivers should quarantine

Caregivers and anyone who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should stay home. Learn when and how to quarantine.

When it's safe for a person who has been sick to be around others

Deciding when it is safe to be around others is different for different situations. Find out when someone who is sick can safely end home isolation.

Eat in separate rooms or areas

Stay separated: The person who is sick should eat (or be fed) in their room, if possible.

Wash dishes and utensils using gloves and hot water: Handle any dishes, cups/glasses, or silverware used by the person who is sick with gloves. Wash them with soap and hot water or in a dishwasher.

Clean hands after taking off gloves or handling used items.

Avoid sharing personal items

Do not share: Do not share dishes, cups/glasses, silverware, towels, bedding, or electronics (like a cell phone) with the person who is sick.

When to wear a mask or gloves

The person who is sick

The person who is sick should wear a mask when they are around other people at home and out (including before they enter a doctor’s office).

The mask helps prevent a person who is sick from spreading the virus to others. It keeps respiratory droplets contained and from reaching other people.

masks should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is not able to remove the covering without help.

Caregiver

Wear gloves when you touch or have contact with the sick person’s blood, stool, or body fluids, such as saliva, mucus, vomit, and urine. Throw out gloves into a lined trash can and wash hands right away.

The caregiver should ask the sick person to put on a mask before entering the room.

The caregiver may also wear a mask when caring for a person who is sick.

To prevent getting sick, make sure you practice everyday preventive actions: clean hands often; avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands; and frequently clean and disinfect surfaces.

Note: During the COVID-19 pandemic, medical grade masks are reserved for healthcare workers and some first responders. You may need to make a mask using a scarf or bandana.

Clean your hands often

Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Tell everyone in the home to do the same, especially after being near the person who is sick.

Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

Hands off: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Learn more about handwashing.

Clean and then disinfect


Clean and disinfect “high-touch” surfaces and items every day

Around the house

Clean and disinfect “high-touch” surfaces and items every day: This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, toilets, faucets, sinks, and electronics.

Clean the area or item with soap and water if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.

Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to kill germs. Many also recommend wearing gloves, making sure you have good air flow, and wiping or rinsing off the product after use.

Most household disinfectants should be effective.

To clean electronics, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products. If those directions are not available, use alcohol-based wipes or spray containing at least 70% alcohol.

Learn more about cleaning and disinfecting your home.

Bedroom and bathroom

If you are using a separate bedroom and bathroom: Only clean the area around the person who is sick when needed, such as when the area is soiled. This will help limit your contact with the sick person.

If they feel up to it, the person who is sick can clean their own space. Give the person who is sick personal cleaning supplies such as tissues, paper towels, and cleaners.

If sharing a bathroom: The person who is sick should clean and then disinfect after each use. If this is not possible, wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom before coming in to clean and use the bathroom.

Wash and dry laundry

Do not shake dirty laundry.

Wear disposable gloves while handling dirty laundry.

Dirty laundry from a person who is sick can be washed with other people’s items.

Wash items according to the label instructions. Use the warmest water setting you can.

Remove gloves, and wash hands right away.

Dry laundry, on hot if possible, completely.

Wash hands after putting clothes in the dryer.

Clean and disinfect clothes hampers. Wash hands afterwards.

Use lined trash can


Use gloves when handling trash

Place used disposable gloves and other contaminated items in a lined trash can.

Use gloves when removing garbage bags, and handling and disposing of trash. Wash hands afterwards.

Place all used disposable gloves, masks, and other contaminated items in a lined trash can.

If possible, dedicate a lined trash can for the person who is sick.

Track your own health

Caregivers should stay home and monitor their health for COVID-19 symptoms while caring for the person who is sick.

Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath but other symptoms may be present as well. Trouble breathing is a more serious warning sign that you need medical attention.

Caregivers should continue to stay home after care is complete. Caregivers can leave their home 14 days after their last close contact with the person who is sick (based on the time it takes to develop illness), or 14 days after the person who is sick meets the criteria to end home isolation.

Use CDC’s self-checker tool to help you make decisions about seeking appropriate medical care.

If you are having trouble breathing, call 911. 

Call your doctor or emergency room and tell them your symptoms before going in. They will tell you what to do.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/5/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 14 new positive cases among County residents as listed below. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1166 including 89 deaths.  

9.5.20 covid graphs

Caring for Someone Sick at Home

Advice for caregivers in non-healthcare settings

If you are caring for someone with COVID-19 at home or in a non-healthcare setting, follow this advice to protect yourself and others. Learn what to do when someone has symptoms of COVID-19. or when someone has been diagnosed with the virus. This information also should be followed when caring for people who have tested positive but are not showing symptoms.

*Note: Older adults and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for developing more severe illness from COVID-19. People at higher risk of severe illness should call their doctor as soon as symptoms start.

Provide support

Make sure the person who is sick drinks a lot of fluids and rests

Help the person who is sick follow their doctor’s instructions for care and medicine.

For most people, symptoms last a few days, and people usually feel better after a week.

See if over-the-counter medicines for fever help the person feel better.

Make sure the person who is sick drinks a lot of fluids and rests.

Help them with grocery shopping, filling prescriptions, and getting other items they may need. Consider having the items delivered through a delivery service, if possible.

Take care of their pet(s), and limit contact between the person who is sick and their pet(s) when possible.

Watch for warning signs

Have their doctor’s phone number on hand.

Call their doctor if the person keeps getting sicker. For medical emergencies, call 911 and tell the dispatcher that the person has or might have COVID-19.

When to seek emergency medical attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

Trouble breathing

Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

New confusion

Inability to wake or stay awake

Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

COVID-19 Update 9/4/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 11 new positive cases among County residents and 0 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below. The County is thankful to have zero new deaths to report today.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1152 including 89 deaths.  

9.4.20 covid graphs

Isolate If You Are Sick

Isolation is used to separate people infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, from people who are not infected.

People who are in isolation should stay home until it’s safe for them to be around others. In the home, anyone sick or infected should separate themselves from others by staying in a specific “sick room” or area and using a separate bathroom (if available).

Who needs to isolate?

People who have COVID-19

People who have symptoms of COVID-19 and are able to recover at home

People who have no symptoms (are asymptomatic) but have tested positive for infection with SARS-CoV-2

Steps to take

Stay home except to get medical care

Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately

Stay in a separate room from other household members, if possible

Use a separate bathroom, if possible

Avoid contact with other members of the household and pets

Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils

Wear a mask when around other people, if you are able to

When you can be around others after you had or likely had COVID-19

When you can be around others (end home isolation) depends on different factors for different situations.

I think or know I had COVID-19, and I had symptoms

You can be with others after

At least 10 days since symptoms first appeared and

At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and

Symptoms have improved

If you had severe illness from COVID-19 (you were admitted to a hospital and needed oxygen), your healthcare provider may recommend that you stay in isolation for longer than 10 days after your symptoms first appeared (possibly up to 20 days) and you may need to finish your period of isolation at home. If testing is available in your community, your healthcare provider may recommend that you undergo repeat testing for COVID-19 to end your isolation earlier than would be done according to the criteria above. If so, you can be around others after you receive two negative tests results in a row, from tests done at least 24 hours apart.

I tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms

If you continue to have no symptoms, you can be with others after:

10 days have passed since the date you had your positive test

If testing is available in your community, your healthcare provider may recommend that you undergo repeat testing for COVID-19 to end your isolation earlier than would be done according to the criteria above. If so, you can be around others after you receive two negative test results in a row, from tests done at least 24 hours apart.

If you develop symptoms after testing positive, follow the guidance above for “I think or know I had COVID, and I had symptoms.”

I had COVID-19 or I tested positive for COVID-19 and I have a weakened immune system

If you have a weakened immune system (immunocompromised) due to a health condition or medication, you might need to stay home and isolate longer than 10 days. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.

If testing is available in your community, your healthcare provider may recommend you undergo repeat testing for COVID-19.  If your healthcare provider recommends testing, you can be with others after you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.

Your doctor may work with an infectious disease expert at your local health department to determine when you can be around others.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


Cape May County Drive-thru COVID-19 Testing On August 20th

Cape May Court House- Freeholder Jeff Pierson announces that the Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network (CCHN) are partnering to open drive-thru COVID-19 testing clinics. The drive-throughs will be held on August 20th by appointment only at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 starting at 8am. 

 Persons requesting COVID-19 testing will need an appointment with a CCHN provider

  • Persons requesting a COVID-19 test will be screened by the CCHN provider
  • Persons requesting COVID-19 tests can be tested whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or COVID-19 exposure and No-symptoms. Many people have had some type of exposure and although they have no symptoms, wish to be tested and that is acceptable.

Appointments for screenings can be requested by visiting CompleteCareNJ.org and clicking the Request an Appointment tab or calling 609-465-0258. To help save time, using the website is recommended.

Once your appointment request is received, you will receive a call back from a CompleteCare representative to help you schedule your visit. If testing is required, your prescription will be sent to the Health Department who will then call you to schedule your drive-thru testing time.

The full process for scheduling an appointment for COVID-19 drive-thru testing and more information about the virus can be found at CompleteCareNJ.org/COVID19.

CompleteCare accepts Medicaid, Medicare as well as private insurance plans and those without insurance. The test will be free of charge and no co-pay will be required for the screening. Your insurance company will be billed for the test and screening. For those who do not have insurance, the cost will be covered by the federal government. Translation services are available for those in need.

Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network will work to ensure people are informed of their results in a timely manner. This is a nasal saline test and results are usually available within 3-4 days, however recently some delays have been experienced due to a surge in testing.

There is currently no vaccine or treatment for COVID-19. The best thing to do is protect yourself by wearing a mask, social distancing and washing your hands often. If you are sick, please help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to friends and family by doing the following:

  • Stay home except to get medical care. Most individuals with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. It is important that you do not leave your home, except to get medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor.Call before you get medical care. Call 9-1-1 or visit the emergency department if you are having trouble breathing or other serious symptoms.
  • Monitor your symptoms. Common symptoms include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention but call first.
  • Do not visit public places and avoid public transportation.
  • Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as “home isolation”. You want to stay away from others as much as possible. Create a “sick room” if possible.
  • Call your doctor ahead before visiting. Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes. 
  • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items. 
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day. 


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.